Student Performance & Accountability > Federal, State, and Local Accountability Systems

Federal, State, and Local Accountability Systems

Federal and State Accountability Systems
 

 
Federal Accountability System
 
 
No Child Left Behind
 
 
 
Section 1111(h)(2) of the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) requires each local education agency (LEA) that receives Title I, Part A funding to disseminate specific LEA- and campus-level data to 1) all LEA campuses, 2) parents of all enrolled students, and 3) to make the information widely available through public means such as posting on the internet, distribution to the media, or distribution through public agencies.
 
 
Adequate Yearly Progress
 
Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) is the accountability component of the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001. The Department of Education requires that all states rate their public schools based on whether or not they met adequate yearly progress in reading and math on the state's assessment and on one additional indicator. Both performance and participation in reading and math is evaluated in terms of all students and six student groups - African-American, Hispanic, White, Economically Disadvantaged, Special Education, and Limited English Proficiency. For elementary and middle schools, the additional indicator is attendance. For high schools and districts, the additional indicator is the four-year longitudinal graduation rate based on a ninth-grade cohort. Ratings given are "Met AYP" or "Missed AYP".
 

State Accountability System
 
Texas Academic Performance Report (TAPR) formerly known as Academic Excellence Indicator System (AEIS)  
 
Due to changes in legislation, the performance report formerly known as the Academic Excellence Indicator System (AEIS) report is now the Texas Academic Performance Report (TAPR).
 
Texas Academic Performance Report 2012-2013 Initial Implementation 


Due to changes in legislation, the performance report formerly known as the Academic Excellence Indicator System (AEIS) report is now the Texas Academic Performance Report (TAPR).

 
Performance Based Monitoring and Analysis System
 
The Division of Performance-Based Monitoring is responsible for developing the Performance-Based Monitoring Analysis System (PBMAS) which is an automated data system that reports annually on the performance of school districts and charter schools in selected program areas including:
  • bilingual education/English as a second language,
  • career and technical education,
  • special education, and
  • certain programs under the No Child Left Behind Act
From the data contained in the PBMAS, the division also designs and maintains the annual Performance-Based Monitoring Analysis System Summary Report. This is a district-level report that includes specific data for each performance indicator in the PBMAS.
  
The Division of Performance-Based Monitoring is also responsible for developing and reporting on a variety of data validation indicators, including indicators to examine leaver/dropout records, discipline data, and student assessment data.
 
  • Data Validation Monitoring - Leavers
  • Data Validation Monitoring - Discipline
  • Data Validation Monitoring - Student Assessment
 
Data Validation Monitoring Leavers
 

Texas Education Agency (TEA) monitoring and intervention activities have been designed to focus on a data-driven and performance-based system that will take place in a continuous improvement model. Intervention activities in the system reflect an emphasis on data integrity, data analysis, increased student performance and improved program effectiveness. The system for TEA monitoring is referenced as the Performance-Based Monitoring (PBM) system.

The TEA has conducted an initial review of leaver data submitted by local education agencies (LEAs) through the Public Education Information Management System (PEIMS) and has provided the results of this review in the 2012 Data Validation Report: Leaver Records. The results of the leaver data review have been used to determine stages of intervention for the monitoring of student leaver data.

The Data Validation Monitoring (DVM) system reflects the use of graduated interventions based on an analysis of local education agency (LEA) data reports as evidenced by the 2012 Leaver Records Data Validation Indicators. Results on each data validation indicator, patterns across indicators, longitudinal data analyses, and staging determinations across PBM program areas, including on-site visit schedules, were examined to determine appropriate levels of intervention.

The Data Validation Monitoring (DVM) system reflects the use of graduated interventions based on an analysis of local education agency (LEA) data reports as evidenced by the 2012 Leaver Records Data Validation Indicators. Results on each data validation indicator, patterns across indicators, longitudinal data analyses, and staging determinations across PBM program areas, including on-site visit schedules, were examined to determine appropriate levels of intervention.

Additional information related to data validation interventions also is available on the Program Monitoring and Interventions website under the Data Validation Monitoring link in the left column at: http://www.tea.state.tx.us/pmi. Resources include a Framework for PBM Data Validation and a Completion and Submittal Matrix for the implementation of DVM interventions.


Public Education Grant
 
In 1995, the Texas Legislature created the Public Education Grant (PEG) program [TEC §§29.201 - 29.205]. The PEG program permits parents whose children attend schools on the PEG list to request that their children transfer to schools in other districts. A list of PEG-designated schools is provided to districts annually. By February 1, districts must notify each parent of a student in the district assigned to attend a school on the PEG list. Based on the February list, parents may request a transfer for the following school year. (For example, the list provided to parents by February 1, 2016 allows for transfer requests for the 2016-17 school year.)
 
Districts are instructed to provide a clear, concise explanation of PEG when they notify parents. Each school’s situation for being on the PEG list is unique, and so each school must write its own letter, addressing its specific situation. In writing this letter, it is recommended that local administrators:
  • state the basic situation (that the school is on the PEG list for the 2016-17 school year);
  • describe what the PEG program is
  • explain how the school came to be on the list;
  • address how the school plans to remedy any problems; and,
  • state the district’s policy regarding transfers.
 
Schools are included on the list if:
  1. 50 percent or fewer of the students passed:
  • any reading/English language arts, writing, mathematics, science, or social studies test on STAAR/TAKS, summed across the grades tested at the school
  • in any two of the three preceding years: 2013, 2014, or 2015
 
OR
  
  1. the school was rated Improvement Required in 2013, 2014, or 2015.
For the 2016-2017 school year, the following LISD schools appear on the list:  Bramlette Elementary, Everhart Elementary, Johnston-McQueen Elementary, Ware Elementary, Forest Park Magnet School, and Judson Middle School.
 
Notes:
Certain schools are excluded from PEG identification. Types of schools excluded are:
  • Alternative education campuses that are rated under Alternative Education Accountability (AEA) rating procedures;
  • Disciplinary Alternative Education Programs (DAEPs);
  • Juvenile Justice Alternative Education Programs (JJAEPs);
  • Charter schools;
  • Texas Youth Commission or Texas Juvenile Probation Commission schools;
  • Schools with no students tested or fewer than five students tested on TAKS (in all three years examined).

Contact Information
 
Questions regarding Federal, State and Local Accountability Systems should be addressed to:
Latitia Wilson, Director Research Accountability and Planning
Longview ISD
1301 E. Young Street, 
Longview, Texas 75601
903.381.2200