Longview ISD schools earned 30 total distinctions on accountability ratings, according to the Texas Education Agency.

Campuses earn state distinction, recognition

Mon Sep 19, 2016

Longview ISD schools earned 30 total distinctions on accountability ratings, according to the Texas Education Agency.

"I am pleased, but not surprised," said Superintendent Dr. James Wilcox. "We have made great strides as a district, and we will continue to do so. While we celebrate the hard work of our teachers, students and parents, we also resolve to continue to get better from top to bottom."

Foster Middle School earned all seven distinctions, and Principal John York expressed great pride in his students "earning seven out of seven academic distinction designations,"

"Our school motto is 'Success and Nothing Less,' and our students and staff rose to this challenge. I also want to thank our wonderful parents and community for their support of our school."

Distinctions are awarded to schools based on achievement in performance indicators relative to a group of 40 campuses of similar type, size and student demographics.

Longview High School earned six distinctions, receiving designations in each of the seven categories except English language arts/reading. Judson Middle School also earned six distinctions, receiving designations in each of the seven categories except social studies.

"It's just a sign of things to come," said LHS Principal James Brewer. "We're happy with the progress being made, but we're not going to let up. We're going to continue to strive for excellence in every facet of our campus." 

At the elementary level, Ned E. Williams earned five, Hudson PEP received four, and J.L. Everhart and Johnston-McQueen each earned one.

"The teachers, students, parents and staff accepted the challenge back in 2010 when this school first opened. We pledged during this time to make this the best school 'east of I-45,'" said Williams Elementary Principal Dr. Cynthia Wise. "Earning five Distinctions from TEA is truly an accomplishment, but it could not be possible without all stakeholders working together. It is my responsibility to not only hold teachers accountable, but myself as well, for implementing a rigorous curriculum for our students, while providing an exceptional educational experience."

The state accountability rating system was implemented in 2013 to assess districts, campuses and charter schools. Schools receive one of three ratings - met standard, met alternate standard or improvement required.

Schools must meet the target for areas such as student achievement, student progress, closing performance gaps across all ethnic populations and income levels and postsecondary readiness. Campuses listed as met standard are those that met criteria for either student achievement or student progress, as well as meeting criteria for closing performance gaps and postsecondary readiness.

Student achievement is a snapshot of performance across all subjects, while student progress measures year-to-year progress. Closing performance gaps emphasizes academic achievements of economically disadvantaged students and the two lowest-performing racial/ethnic student groups.

Postsecondary readiness focuses on the importance of earning a high school diploma and providing students with the foundation for success in college, job training programs, the workforce or the military.

In addition to rating districts and individual campus on whether they are meeting standards, the accountability system also hands out distinctions to schools that excel in the areas of English language arts/reading, mathematics, science, social studies, top 25 percent student progress, top 25 percent closing and performance gaps.